Quebec Standard

Tuesday, August 16, 2022

Rogers executives to brief politicians regarding the recent network outage

Quebec

Key takeaways: 

  • Hearings in Ottawa into network outages come as the telecommunications firm attempts to complete the Shaw merger.
  • Rogers CEO Tony Staffieri appeared at a CRTC hearing in the firm’s offered union with Shaw last year. 
  • He’ll be back in Ottawa on Monday to clarify the grounds for the recent telecommunications network outage.

Officials from Rogers Communications Inc. and a slew of other stakeholders are set to occur at a parliamentary committee in Ottawa on Monday to demonstrate how the firm’s recent huge network outage happened and summarize the measures they are taking to assure it won’t happen again.

On July 8, the Rogers network — from cable television to internet and wireless telephone services — ran down and stayed for much of the day while the firm scrambled to figure out what occurred.

Late in the day, the firm separated and managed the core issue, which they said was driven by a software update gone wrong, which then cascaded into a massive chain reaction that took down the whole system. The outage began a slew of clearly unrelated systems to fail above the firm itself, as things as gone as debit payments, 911 services, and government services were inaccessible for much of the day, causing havoc.

Also read: Quebec food banks struggle with increased demand, fewer donations

Officials from Rogers Communications Inc. and a slew of other stakeholders are set to occur at a parliamentary committee in Ottawa on Monday to demonstrate how the firm’s recent huge network outage happened and summarize the measures they are taking to assure it won’t happen again

The outage touched a broad cross-section of Canadian life, flashing outrage from customers and government officials who ordered compensation and guaranteed that the system would be transformed with failsafes to secure functioning backups when things go wrong.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the nation’s telecom regulator, was at the top of the rise of those seeking a lovely explanation. The CRTC sent Rogers a letter the following Tuesday demanding replies to dozens of questions.

The firm was given a deadline of July 22 to answer to those concerns and obviously did so, as the regulator published a censored version of Rogers’ answers on the CRTC’s website on Friday night.

Source – CBC News

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