Quebec Standard

Monday, February 26, 2024

Quebec offers Montreal $117M to help fulfill climate-change plans

Quebec

Key takeaways: 

  • Projet Montréal weather plan targets transportation, urban planning, the energy efficiency of structures.
  • The Project Montréal administration intends to add 800 latest electric-vehicle charging stations over the following three years, getting the total digit to 1,800.

Montreal’s genius plan to make the city greener and more immune to the adverse effects of weather change got a boost Monday with a $117-million contribution from the Quebec government to allow Mayor Valérie Plante to realize her administration’s 10-year climate action goal.

Environment Minister Benoit Charette and the minister liable for the Montreal metropolis, Chantal Rouleau, declared Plante at the Centre for Sustainable Development, the region’s first LEED Platinum structure on Sainte-Catherine Street in downtown Montreal.

In a press release, the city said the funds would move toward installing new public charging stations for electric vehicles, restoring oil and gas heating systems in municipal structures to greener options like electricity, and other measures to lessen the effect of severe climate on Montrealers.

Also read: Quebec probably heading toward 6th surge, says public health director

$117-million contribution from the Quebec government to allow Mayor Valérie Plante to realize her administration’s 10-year climate action goal

The city intends to make 23 water retention basins and 15 artificial ponds covered by vegetation part of Papineau Avenue’s ecological rainwater management project in the Ahuntsic district.

Ponds such as those designed help lower sewer backups: the vegetation acts like a sponge. The ponds give water a place to go during hefty rains, decreasing the possibility of flooding and enhancing water quality.

The city will also grow 94,000 trees by 2024, stated in a press release. That is a significant step toward meeting the administration’s promise to produce half a million trees over the following decade.

Source – cbc.ca

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